Civil status

Number of women

In %

Number of men

In %

Married

8,354

48%

10,744

57%

Unmarried

8,979

52%

7,985

43%

Total

17,333

100%

18,689

100%

Source: Social Insurance Bank (Processed by: Labour Market Research Bureau, DAO)

Table 2 shows a breakdown of private sector employees by age group as at December 2006.

Table 2: Private sector workers by age group:

Age group

Number of women

In %

Number of men

In %

<16

5

0%

3

0%

16-20

358

2%

325

2%

21-25

1,452

8%

1,423

8%

26-30

1,797

10%

1,878

10%

31-35

2,087

12%

2,233

12%

36-40

2,534

15%

2,823

15%

41-45

2,775

16%

2,869

15%

46-50

2,549

15%

2,737

15%

51-55

1,913

11%

1,900

10%

56-60

1,164

7%

1,364

7%

>60

699

4%

1,134

6%

Total

100%

100%

Source: Social Insurance Bank (Processed by: Labour Market Research Bureau, DAO)

Table 3 provides a breakdown of private sector workers by salary as at December 2006.

Table 3: Salaries

Salary category

Number of women

In %

Number of men

In %

< 1,360

1856

11%

896

5%

1,360 – 2,000

7088

41%

5712

31%

2,001 – 2,500

2420

14%

3360

18%

2,501 – 3,000

1629

9%

2264

12%

3,001 – 4,000

1971

11%

2337

13%

4,001 – 5,000

1066

6%

1426

8%

> 5001

1303

8%

2694

14%

Total

100%

100%

Source: Social Insurance Bank (Processed by: Labour Market Research Bureau, DAO)

Table 4 shows the private sector activities in which women were most commonly employed as at December 2006.

Table 4: Top five employment activities for women :

Type of activity

Number of women

In %

Hotels

2,914

17%

Restaurants

1,314

8%

Cleaning

809

5%

Hospitals

682

4%

Banking institutions

649

4%

Source: Social Insurance Bank (Processed by: Labour Market Research Bureau, DAO)

Table 5 shows the private sector activities in which men were most commonly employed as at December 2006.

Table 5: Top five employment activities for men :

Type of activity

Number of men

In %

Hotel

2794

15%

Building contractor

1929

10%

Restaurant

846

5%

Steel construction

816

4%

Security

671

4%

Source: Social Insurance Bank (Processed by: Labour Market Research Bureau, DAO)

The figures above, registered by the DAO, tell us that women find certain occupations in the service sector more attractive than men do. In Aruba , women clearly gravitate towards the hotel and catering sector, cleaning, hospitals and financial services.

Table 6: Practical statistical information on female and male students in the Education for Employment ( Enseñanza pa Empleo , EPE) adult education programme for the years 2005, 2006 and the first half of 2007.

Table 6: Number of EPE students:

2005

2006

First half of 2007

Women: 1,662 (61%)

Men: 1,052 (39%)

Total: 2,714 (100%)

Women: 1,397 (64.1 %)

Men: 782 (35.9 %)

Total: 2,179 (100%)

Women: 648 (60.2 %)

Men: 428 (39.8 %)

Total: 1,076 (100%)

Source: EPE (Processed by: Labour Market Research Bureau, DAO)

Article 12: Health

Teenage pregnancy

In 2005, a number of NGOs set up CEMBRAH, a network of organisations that provides assistance to teenage parents. In 2006, a number of institutions mounted a joint campaign to prevent teenage pregnancy. For further information reference is made to the Second Periodic Report of Aruba under the Convention of the Rights of the Child, paragraphs 27, 52- 55. For statistical information on teenage pregnancy reference is made to Annexe 3.

The Committee recommends that sex education be widely promoted and targeted at both boys and girls, with special attention to the prevention of early pregnancy and the control of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases .

The subject of Personal Development is a significant part of the curriculum of all school types in Aruba . Taking care of your own body, making decisions, saying no and where to get help and ask questions are just some of the important topics addressed. Sex education is also a component of this subject and focuses a great deal of attention on HIV/AIDS and other diseases.

In collaboration with the Department of Health, an HIV/AIDS task force was set up to provide information to the community, organise special activities for young people and give workshops for teachers. The task force and the Women’s Club of Aruba also hold information sessions in schools when asked to.

The Committee calls upon Aruba to ensure the effective implementation of its HIV/AIDS strategies and to provide detailed statistical and analytical information about women and HIV/AIDS in its next periodic report.

The government will try to provide this information at the next opportunity.

Articles 15 and 16: Equality before the courts and before the law

Civil Code of Aruba

As stated in the previous report, it is reasonable to conclude that, following the amendment of Aruba ’s Civil Code in January 2002, one or two statutory provisions remain which are discriminatory in the sense of article 16 of the Convention. One example is the law on names. Pursuant to Book 1, article 5 of the Civil Code of Aruba children acquire their father’s surname. If a child has no legal father, the child acquires the mother’s surname. There is no consistency of opinion in Aruba regarding either a system in which a child can be given either the father’s or the mother’s surname or the Spanish or Portuguese system. Nor is there any evidence to suggest that this is a controversial issue. In practice, the courts tend to follow the wishes of the mother alone or of the mother and the man acknowledging the child and permit acknowledgement without a name change, so the child keeps the mother’s surname .

It is the custom in Aruba for married women to adopt their husband’s surname or prefix it to their own. Book 1, article 9 of the Civil Code stipulates that a woman is permitted to use her own surname or prefix her husband’s surname to her own. This way she keeps her own surname and is free to use it in public. A woman who was married and has not remarried is permitted to continue using her former husband’s surname either exclusively or as a prefix to her own.

The new National Ordinance on Admission and Deportation (LTU)

The legislation pertaining to the admission and deportation of foreign nationals was amended in 2006. The following changes are of particular interest.

Since the translation into law of the 2002 admissions policy, non-nationals (male or female) are permitted to work in Aruba for only three years, after which they must leave the island. P ersons admitted under this legislation are not eligible for family reunification, according to the admissions policy.

One particular area of change has been the status granted to family members of locals with Dutch nationality. Whereas in the past the legislation pertaining to foreign nationals gave them preferential status based on their marriage as long as both parties remained married and lived together, the law now demands that the partner of foreign nationality (male or female) apply for a yearly permit, which can be issued with a work permit at the holder’s request.

Live-in maids are a special category of workers, mainly women, for which demand has grown drastically in recent years. It must be noted that while demand for this category of worker is high, locals have no interest in this sort of work.